Lethewards

Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep,
If it be thus to dream, still let me sleep.

Let me Lethe awhile longer
Let me Lethe as much as soon
Wet with wander waking
or Breathing or was it
I have since forgot
Name nor purpose roaming
Moments all the same

Wash me an ocean
Tide me my shore
Drown me times over
Underneath
Till you tear me sinking when you weep

Memories here steep
Have since forgot
Forgetting
When my body remembers
Walking
Wake me

Lead me to Lethe

insomnia bites

staying up all night, trying out a song to write
a song that’ll make me famous
staying up all night, finding out a song to write
a song that’ll make them jealous

sorry but your password must contain an uppercase letter, a number, a haiku, a gang sign, a hieroglyph, and the blood of a virgin

(Source: stylesthirst, via heyfunniest)

(via )

bythegods:

Eru Ilúvatar
Alright! Today is Tolkien Day, so I’m gonna tell you all about Ilúvatar, the creative force/god analogue in the Lord of the Rings universe. In the Silmarillion, which is a compilation of ancient histories by the Elves, the creation of that world is written, as they understand it.
In the timeless void before any thought of life of any sort existed, Ilúvatar, the One, sat in thought. He brought into being, through his thought, the Ainur, a multitude of angelic spirits. He gave them all free will and a wide range of abilities and talents, but their first great accomplishment was their music. Iluvatar bade the Ainur to make three great themes of music, and after it was performed, they discovered that their song contained an image of the world that was yet to be, as well as the fate of that world unfolding. This was called the Ainulindalë, or the Music of the Ainur.
With a word, Iluvatar commanded the world to be, and it was formed, though it was a chaos of swirling elements. Iluvatar encouraged those of the Ainur who were willing to go down into the world and help form it as they saw in the music, and many did. They each had their own loves, and gave thought to different areas of the world. Melkor, the mightiest of the Ainur, had created dischord in the Music, and went down into the world to destroy the work of the other Ainur, desiring to be its master. Ilúvatar had spoken to the Ainur, however, saying:
“Behold your Music! This is your minstrelsy; and each of you shall find contained herein, amid the design that I set before you, all those things which it may seem that he himself devised or added. And thou, Melkor, wilt discover all the secret thoughts of thy mind, and wilt percieve that they are but a part of the whole and tributary to its glory.”
At this point, Ilúvatar handed over the kingship of Arda (the world) to Manwë, the greatest of the Ainur spirits who went down into the world, save Melkor. He became the chief of the Valar: fourteen of the greatest Ainur who formed and oversaw the greatest portions of the world. Ilúvatar would not intervene until countless years later, after the Children of Ilúvatar (Elves and Men) had awoken.

bythegods:

Eru Ilúvatar

Alright! Today is Tolkien Day, so I’m gonna tell you all about Ilúvatar, the creative force/god analogue in the Lord of the Rings universe. In the Silmarillion, which is a compilation of ancient histories by the Elves, the creation of that world is written, as they understand it.

In the timeless void before any thought of life of any sort existed, Ilúvatar, the One, sat in thought. He brought into being, through his thought, the Ainur, a multitude of angelic spirits. He gave them all free will and a wide range of abilities and talents, but their first great accomplishment was their music. Iluvatar bade the Ainur to make three great themes of music, and after it was performed, they discovered that their song contained an image of the world that was yet to be, as well as the fate of that world unfolding. This was called the Ainulindalë, or the Music of the Ainur.

With a word, Iluvatar commanded the world to be, and it was formed, though it was a chaos of swirling elements. Iluvatar encouraged those of the Ainur who were willing to go down into the world and help form it as they saw in the music, and many did. They each had their own loves, and gave thought to different areas of the world. Melkor, the mightiest of the Ainur, had created dischord in the Music, and went down into the world to destroy the work of the other Ainur, desiring to be its master. Ilúvatar had spoken to the Ainur, however, saying:

“Behold your Music! This is your minstrelsy; and each of you shall find contained herein, amid the design that I set before you, all those things which it may seem that he himself devised or added. And thou, Melkor, wilt discover all the secret thoughts of thy mind, and wilt percieve that they are but a part of the whole and tributary to its glory.”

At this point, Ilúvatar handed over the kingship of Arda (the world) to Manwë, the greatest of the Ainur spirits who went down into the world, save Melkor. He became the chief of the Valar: fourteen of the greatest Ainur who formed and oversaw the greatest portions of the world. Ilúvatar would not intervene until countless years later, after the Children of Ilúvatar (Elves and Men) had awoken.